© 2019 by Goucher College Writing Program  |   For Questions email phaye.poliakoff-chen@goucher.edu

Session F

Friday, July 26th, 4:40 PM - 5:40 PM

Falkland

Reinstituting the Teaching of Style as a Result of Agile Design in a Developmental Writing Program

Sarah E. Austin, USAFA Prep; Nicholas J DeSpain, USAFA Prep; William Rogers, USAFA Prep

People of Color Caucus

This panel of nontenured WPAs and faculty showcases our use of agile design to assess our programs effectiveness in teaching students style. We argue that such a process is useful for WPA work and given our data, we expressly advocate for the reintegration of style-focused pedagogy in developmental writing programs. Examples of our own curricular and pedagogical changes are provided as examples of how this looks in developmental writing classrooms that have a large number of students of color, and underrepresented students.

Heron

Topics in Assessment

Assessing Writing Proficiency: Valuable Tool or Unjust Constraint?

Vivian Kao, Lawrence Technological University

This presentation discusses gatekeeping writing exams that unlock registration for upper-division courses and serve as a requirement for graduation. I present an overview of an exam given at my institution as a case study and invite dialogue on benefits and harms, as well as experiential accounts and cautionary tales.

So Long Scantrons: Designing a Portfolio-based Assessment for a First-year Writing & Ethics Program

Allyce Horan, Director of the Writing Center, Colorado School of Mines
Self-Care

This presentation explores the effectiveness of a portfolio assignment that replaced a multiple-choice final exam in a first-year composition and ethics program at the Colorado School of Mines. Topics include portfolios and inclusivity, portfolios and catharsis, and the effectiveness of portfolios for evaluating writing development and ethical awareness.

Using ePortfolios to Foster Writing Across the International Curriculum

Mark Brantner, National University of Singapore

This presentation discusses gatekeeping writing exams that unlock registration for upper-division courses and serve as a requirement for graduation. I present an overview of an exam given at my institution as a case study and invite dialogue on benefits and harms, as well as experiential accounts and cautionary tales.

Galena

Committing to Accessibility

Don't Drop the Mic - Hearing Loss as an Invisible Disability

Marjorie Stewart, Glenville State College

Approximately 15 percent of adults between 20 and 69 have significant hearing loss, and the numbers increase with age, with about two percent of adults aged 45-54 having disabling hearing loss. Why, then, do speakers refuse to use microphones in meetings, in spite of protests from the audience?

Embracing Universal Design in Departmental Document Construction through Differential Consciousness

Kristin Bennett, Arizona State University

To pursue inclusivity, compositionists should exchange neoliberal neutrality for universal design. Applying disability rhetorics, this presentation evaluates the problematic nature of the neutral discourse used in a composition department's documents. It offers and models intersectional coalition as a method to construct departmental documents that embrace, rather than erase, difference.

Accessible Assignments: Thinking Visually About Writing Prompts

Gregory L. Farber, Bentley University

When we design our assignment prompts, are we considering students from diverse backgrounds or those with learning disabilities? This presentation will combine new research on how students read prompts with experiments using marketing and visual web design techniques to consider new ways we might make our assignments more accessible.

Iron

Including Undergraduates in Intellectual Work

A Higher Love: Toward a Theory of Intellectual Affect and Undergraduate Research

Dominic DelliCarpini, York College of Pennsylvania

Drawing upon focus group research, this paper offers a theory of the intellectual affect, arguing that the impact upon intellectual growth and engagement of undergraduate researchers should be seen through a lens of embodied, emotional, and relational growth” the growth of a higher love based upon intellectual pursuits.

Working with Undergraduate Researchers During Large-Scale Curricular Change

J. Michael Rifenburg, University of North Georgia

This presentation offers an argument for incorporating undergraduate researchers in large-scale curricular change, specifically change directed at first-year writing courses, and practical steps for doing so.

When Did Including Student Voices Become Radical? Or, True Inclusivity Is Hard

Joyce Olewski Inman, University of Southern Mississippi

Compositionists have a well-documented history of prioritizing students but also of theoretical agendas related to teaching writing. This talk explores ways we often ignore students desires and experiences when they do not celebrate our priorities and suggests moves toward assessment methods that include student voices in more meaningful ways.

James

Radical at the Root: Co-Creating Writing Program Design

Rachel Wenrick, Drexel University; Lauren Lowe, Drexel University

Tenure Free

Intergenerational members of a university-community writing program in West Philadelphia will give a short talk + interactive workshop on co-creation as a design method for radical inclusion. Following Creative Reaction Labs Equity-Centered Community Design Field Guide, this session aims to provide WPAs with tools for impacting their own programs.

Essex A

Research Writing Group

Dylan Dryer

Join WPA-GO for the 2019 reboot of the storied Research/Writing Group, a committee tasked with organizing 1-on-1 and small-group mentoring with goals of supporting the development of graduate students' research writing at all stages and across genres. This year's session of RWG 2.0 will be a focused workshop on the phraseology of the ubiquitous "literature review" -- an indispensable feature of research writing, from dissertations to grant proposals to article manuscripts. This session will include some discussion, some participatory exercises, and some focused writing time. Be sure to bring a draft paragraph in which you are working with multiple secondary sources.

Essex B

Research Writing Group

Dylan Dryer

Join WPA-GO for the 2019 reboot of the storied Research/Writing Group, a committee tasked with organizing 1-on-1 and small-group mentoring with goals of supporting the development of graduate students' research writing at all stages and across genres. This year's session of RWG 2.0 will be a focused workshop on the phraseology of the ubiquitous "literature review" -- an indispensable feature of research writing, from dissertations to grant proposals to article manuscripts. This session will include some discussion, some participatory exercises, and some focused writing time. Be sure to bring a draft paragraph in which you are working with multiple secondary sources.

Essex C

Lending Voice to Silenced Groups

Writing Instruction on the Inside: Reimagining FYW Pedagogy behind Prison Walls

Jessica Pisano, UNC Asheville

In Spring 2019, I began teaching FYW in my university's newly-established prison education program. In this talk, I will discuss the curricular and pedagogical changes mandated by this shift in context and invite participants to share strategies for teaching writing in prison.

The Carceral WPA: Notes on Writing Program Administration in College-in-Prison Programs

Logan Middleton, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

In response to the dearth of WPA scholarship on writing administration work in carceral contexts, this presentation will explore what WPAs can learn from supporting student writing and learning in prison spaces that are designed to systematically control, oppress, and dehumanize the populations inside them.

Laurel AB

Exploring Knowledge and Its Production

Helping Students Understanding 21st Century Production and Publication of Texts as a Key Step to Cultivating Critical Reading Practices

Bess Fox, Marymount University

Students lack a background in print culture that would help them understand the audiences and purposes of texts they are reading. This paper reports on a qualitative study of a first-year writing curriculum that foregrounds the historical print culture of texts students read and cite.

Access Points and the Egalitarian Classroom: Optimizing Inclusion Through Book Club Pedagogy

Kylie A. Pugh, University of West Florida

The growing demand for high-impact practice (HIP) curriculum in higher education has created an opportunity for novel, unconventional pedagogies. Book club pedagogy fulfills the rigors of HIP while optimizing access and inclusion for diverse student populations, culminating in an egalitarian classroom that fosters literacy through leadership.

Exploratory Writing as Disciplinary Inclusion

John Charles Goshert, Utah Valley University

This paper advocates for including exploratory research projects in FYC courses. The exploratory genre invites all students into authentic knowledge making approaches in any discipline and provides support for WPAs to demonstrate the broad institutional value and impact of their programs.

Laurel CD

Radical Assessment

Chair: Megan Crowley-Watson

Big, Hot Mess: Negotiating Radical Seats at the Table for Internal and External Program Assessment

Jeanne Law Bohannon, Kennesaw State University; Risa P. Gorelick, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Mentoring

Questions about balancing best practices, academic freedom, and program consistency both intrigue and dismay WPAs. Add in rapid institutional change and contingent faculty, and we have a radical roundtable discussion where scholar-teachers come together to cultivate mutual mentoring. Panelists seek advice and offer thoughts on leading in times of change.

Victorians, Terministic Screens, and Assessment Committees: Applying Lessons from the Past

Vicki Davis, Indiana Tech

Hindsight is 20/20, people say, but even such clarity cannot ward off the complexity of assessment. In this presentation, I discuss how analyzing the rhetoric of education reform in Victorian England through Burkes terministic screens influences my current work as a member of my institutions Assessment Committee.

Kent AB

Issues of Ownership and Digital Spaces

Transliterate Performance In Digital Spaces: Challenging Notions of Error and Plagiarism Enacted in Writing Program Policies

Emily Simnitt, University of Oregon

Using behind-the-scenes writing process from two Chinese multilingual international writers-- one with a successful text but limited process and one with a plagiarized text but complex composing processes -- I ask: how might we revise plagiarism policies to recognize what I term transliterate performance in transnational networked digital interfaces?

Talking About Plagiarism Isn't Enough: Radical Thoughts on "Defining and Avoiding Plagiarism: The WPA Statement on Best Practices"

Traci Gardner, Department of English at Virginia Tech

Based on an analysis of the 2003 statement Defining and Avoiding Plagiarism: The WPA Statement on Best Practices and a survey of writing handbooks, this presentation identifies gaps in the discussion and calls for a new WPA statement that covers best practices for defining and respecting intellectual property rights.

From Page to Program: Digital Writing Scholarship in FYC Curriculum and Writing Program Design

Rebecca Petitti, University of Massachusetts Amherst

I argue for a programmatic focus on the uptake of FYC and digital technology research. Using this scholarship, in tandem with the WPA Outcomes Statements, I explore if and how disciplinary knowledge is enacted in Writing Program design at several institutions, and look at the factors that enable this engagement.

Kent C

Directed Self-Placement: Implications and Perspectives

Toward a Rhetorical Model of Directed Self-Placement

Zhaozhe Wang, Purdue University
People of Color Caucus

In this presentation, I propose a rhetorical model of directed self-placement that aims to fully recognize student agents position, deliberation, negotiation, and appropriation in relation to the placement decision, and to engage the student in a rhetorical rehearsal before signing the placement contract.

"I loved it because it is truly up to you": Student perspectives on choice and agency in DSP

Jeroen Gevers, University of Arizona; Erin Whittig, University of Arizona

The presenters discuss an ongoing assessment of student experiences with DSP at a Southwestern university, emphasizing self-perception and choice. A preliminary analysis shows how various components of our DSP inform the decision-making process. We welcome feedback on ways to further elicit students experiences of choice and agency in follow-up interviews.

Assessing Confidence & Apprehension: Learning Preferences & DSP

Kathleen Kryger, University of Arizona

Directed self-placement (DSP) can provide students with opportunities to reflect on their learning preferences in addition to their self-perceptions of writing skills. The presenter argues for a more inclusive DSP by analyzing students placement decisions in relation to their levels of confidence and learning preferences for classroom environments.